Pretending

Me – Ella, the landlords are visiting on Saturday morning. You know what that means, don’t you?
Ella – Yes. It means we have to pretend that we keep the house tidy.

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Pretending

Me – Ella, the landlords are visiting on Saturday morning. You know what that means, don’t you?
Ella – Yes. It means we have to pretend that we keep the house tidy.

Reading

A couple of weeks ago Ella started bringing readers home. It was a great moment when she read a book to me for the first time. And I loved listening to that hackled, stuttering reading without any intonation whatsoever. I could tell she was truly reading as opposed to having memorised it because she struggled with the word “here” on every single page.

She’s been bringing books home regularly since and her reading is coming along in leaps and bounds. What a fantastic milestone! Even more fantastic because they don’t really understand what a magical gift being able to read and write is. But she still enjoys it and feels very proud. So she should be being one of the first in her class to “get it”.

But the proudest moment for me was when we were at the RSPCA the other day and she pointed out a sign with a cute puppy dog on it. I asked her to read the sign and after concentrating and sounding out the first word, she read: “Woof, woof, woof, woof”.

Not exactly Dostojevski, but a huge step towards greater independence. If only all signs were in dog language, she’d be there already.

 

Reading

A couple of weeks ago Ella started bringing readers home. It was a great moment when she read a book to me for the first time. And I loved listening to that hackled, stuttering reading without any intonation whatsoever. I could tell she was truly reading as opposed to having memorised it because she struggled with the word “here” on every single page.

She’s been bringing books home regularly since and her reading is coming along in leaps and bounds. What a fantastic milestone! Even more fantastic because they don’t really understand what a magical gift being able to read and write is. But she still enjoys it and feels very proud. So she should be being one of the first in her class to “get it”.

But the proudest moment for me was when we were at the RSPCA the other day and she pointed out a sign with a cute puppy dog on it. I asked her to read the sign and after concentrating and sounding out the first word, she read: “Woof, woof, woof, woof”.

Not exactly Dostojevski, but a huge step towards greater independence. If only all signs were in dog language, she’d be there already.

Honest

Ella – Mum, you know I love you for so many reasons. And one of those reasons is because you give me money and battegongs [= bakugans].

Honest

Ella – Mum , you know I love you for so many reasons. And one of those reasons is because you give me money and battegongs [= bakugans].

Things I would’ve never expected to hear my child say

Opening the front door for a friend last night:

Ella – Hi Mikki. [Casually] We’re just killing some baby mice. Do you want to come see our other mice?